Roasted Butternut Squash Lasagna

Almost every post I’ve read this new year features a salad or other “detox” recipe. I get that’s the way the food editorial calendar works, but considering I spent most of December just trying to eat anything, nevermind becoming a Christmas-cookie glutton, I figure there is no point in faking a dietary reset.

Bam. Here’s a lasagna.

This might seem more time-intensive than you’d like for a lasagna, especially if you normally make lasagna with the “open and dump” method. I like this version because I adore butternut squash, and the sauce makes enough for you to save some extra for another night. The flavors of the vegetables also come through better than on a standard lasagna – I dislike standard lasagna for its heavy hand when it comes to bland ricotta and overpowering “Italian-seasoned” sauce.

A few notes:

  • The butternut squash here is measured by cups rather than by the size of the whole squash. Squash varies a lot, and even two squashes of the same weight can yield different amounts of flesh, depending on how you peel and the amount of pulp and seeds inside. Butternut squash can be used in anything; get extra.
  • I used rubbed sage, which I bought at Penzey’s. You can use regular dried sage in equal amounts, or about half as much ground sage. Typically I grind the rubbed sage between my palms (holding my hands over the pot) after I measure to ensure even flavor.
  • You can substitute any winter green for the kale, if you like.

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Roasted Butternut Squash Lasagna

Ingredients
6 cups cubed butternut squash
4 cloves garlic
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 teaspoon salt, divided
3 cups diced tomatoes, or 1 24-ounce can, drained
1/2 teaspoon rubbed sage
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon dried tarragon
Pinch cinnamon
2 cups vegetable stock
15 ounces ricotta
4 ounces shredded gouda, divided
2 ounces shredded Parmesan
1 egg, beaten
4 leaves kale, ribs removed and leaves chopped
12 no-boil lasagna noodles (or use regular, and cook according to package instructions)

Method
Preheat oven to 400°F. Toss squash, garlic, 2 tablespoons olive oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt together, then spread onto a large baking sheet. Roast for 20 minutes, stirring halfway. Turn oven down to 350°F.

Sauté tomatoes, 2 tablespoons olive oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt over medium heat until tomatoes have broken down. Add 3 cups roasted squash and the garlic. (Reserve the remaining squash for later.) Cover and simmer for about 15 minutes.

Stir in sage, ginger, paprika, tarragon, and cinnamon. Stir vegetable stock and adjust seasoning, if necessary. Heat through, then purée with an immersion blender. Reserve 2 cups of the sauce for another use.

Mix together ricotta, half the gouda, Parmesan and egg.

To assemble the lasagna:

Spread about 1/2 cup sauce on the bottom of a 9×13 baking dish. Arrange 4 lasagna noodles on top, then spread on half of the ricotta mixture. Add half the kale, and 1 cup of roasted squash. Cover with 1 cup of sauce and repeat noodles, ricotta, kale, and squash. Cover with 1 cup of sauce, then place on last lasagna noodles. Top with remaining squash, 1/2 cup sauce, and remaining gouda cheese.

Cover dish with foil and bake for about 50 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes before serving.

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Comments

  1. says

    I would eat this for every meal if I could, but the carnivore in the house will require I add some ground turkey. It’s gonna be goooooood.

    [Reply]

    Megan Reply:

    @Amber I usually don’t tell the husband if there isn’t meat so by the time he finds out it’s too late ;)

    [Reply]

  2. says

    I think butternut squash and pasta are the perfect combination. I often roast the squash with garlic, cinnamon and red pepper flake and serve over tortellini with parmesan. You’ve inspired me to serve the whole thing over sauteed kale.

    [Reply]

  3. says

    This sounds like such a cool recipe! The traditional meat and tomato sauce lasagna can get pretty boring, so this looks like a really yummy change of pace.

    [Reply]

  4. Annie says

    Do you cook the lasagna noodles first?

    [Reply]

    Megan Reply:

    @Annie, I used no-boil noodles, but you could use regular noodles and cook them first. Thank you for pointing this out; I’ll make an edit on the recipe!

    [Reply]

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