Mashed Rutabaga with Parmesan

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Mashed rutabaga with parmesan is a simple way to prepare this root vegetable. It’s a great way to ease into trying a new vegetable.

Have you ever had rutabaga? 

My grandmother would make it every year for the holidays, even though it seemed like no one ate more than a polite taste.

Now that I am older and exploring all kinds of vegetables, it was time to give rutabaga another go.

white bowl with mashed rutabaga

We often get rutabaga in our winter CSA, and this mashed rutabaga with parmesan has become my go-to way of preparing it.

What is a rutabaga?

Rutabaga, also called swede, neep, or Swedish turnip, is a root vegetable in the brassica family. It’s similar to turnips in flavor, mildly sweet and bitter.

Here in the United States it is not popular, but in countries like Finland, Sweden, and Norway, it is enjoyed a variety of ways, especially at Christmastime. 

Because rutabagas are root vegetables, they are great for storing longer in the winter and enjoyed in cozy stews and casseroles.

rutabaga on cutting board

How to cook rutabaga

Mashed rutabaga is one of the easiest ways to prepare it, especially when you add cream and cheese!

Peel your rutabaga and trim off any root ends. Cut it into chunks and place into a large pot, then cover with cold water.

You can add a bit of sugar to the water to help reduce the bitterness, but I recommend trying it without first.

Bring the water to a boil, and cook the rutabaga until tender. 

Rutabagas are harder than potatoes, so don’t expect them to cook as quickly. Test the rutabaga for doneness after 20 minutes and continue cooking until soft.

Once soft, drain well and mash just as you would potatoes. Warm the butter and cream just slightly, then mix into the rutabaga along with the cheese, continuing to mash and stir. 

bowl of mashed rutabaga

Rutabaga is lower in starch than potatoes, so when you mash you don’t need to worry about the texture becoming gummy. You can do this by hand, with an immersion blender, or with a hand mixer to get the consistency you prefer.

Add salt and pepper to taste, along with any additional butter or cheese for serving.

What can I add to mashed rutabaga?

While I like to use parmesan for the mild nutty flavor, you can swap in your favorite cheese. Make sure to use freshly grated for the best flavor and texture when blending into your mash.

You can also add carrots, parsnips, or potatoes to mashed rutabaga to help balance any residual bitterness of the rutabaga.

Top it with fresh herbs, like thyme, rosemary, or sage. Or, try a pinch of ground cardamom or nutmeg.

mashed rutabaga in a bowl with butter and cheese

Looking for other ways to enjoy rutabaga? Try this easy roast swede (rutabaga) or spicy scalloped rutabagas with parsley.

white bowl with mashed rutabaga

Parmesan Mashed Rutabaga

Mashed rutabaga with parmesan is a simple way to prepare this root vegetable. It’s a great way to ease into trying a new vegetable.
5 from 2 votes
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Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Total Time 40 mins
Course Side Dishes
Cuisine Swedish
Servings 6 servings
Calories 133 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 rutabaga, about 1 ½ pounds
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/3 cup grated fresh parmesan
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

  • Trim ends and roots from rutabaga, peel, and chop into chunks. Add to a large stockpot and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil and cook for 20-30 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork.
  • Drain, return to pot, and mash. Warm butter and cream, then mix into rutabaga along with parmesan. Continue to mash or use a hand mixer to mix until your desired consistency is achieved (it might not be as smooth as mashed potatoes).
  • Add salt and pepper to taste, and serve with additional butter and parmesan on top.

Nutrition

Serving: 1 gCalories: 133 kcalCarbohydrates: 3 gProtein: 2 gFat: 13 gSaturated Fat: 8 gCholesterol: 36 mgSodium: 215 mgFiber: 1 gSugar: 1 g
Tried this recipe?Share on Instagram and mention @stetted or tag #stetted!

7 Comments

  1. OMG… but I may try it if you make it for me. You did try Gramma’s. Once. That was all I ever asked.
    And to this day I won’t touch them if I know it’s a rutabaga because of how she made them.

  2. OMG… but I may try it if you make it for me. You did try Gramma’s. Once. That was all I ever asked.
    And to this day I won’t touch them if I know it’s a rutabaga because of how she made them.

  3. Hi!I found your site via Twitter. Rutabaga is a recent addition to my food-love list, especially when made with lots and lots of butter. Of course, there isn’t much out there that isn’t improved with lots of butter – and salt, as you point out above. The recipe looks great (and I’ve added Stetted to my Google Reader!).

  4. I make a version of this myself, but with half carrots, half rutabaga, and instead of cream I use chicken or veg stock, some butter, and salt and pepper. Totally yum!

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